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Necessary Endings: The Employees, Businesses, and Relationships That All of Us Have to Give Up in Order to Move Forward

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“If you’re hesitant to pull the trigger when things obviously aren't working out, Henry Cloud’s Necessary Endings may be the most important book you read all year.” —Dave Ramsey, New York Times bestselling author of The Total Money Makeover “Cloud is a wise, experienced, and compassionate guide through [life’s] turbulent passages.” —Bob Buford, bestelling author of Halftime “If you’re hesitant to pull the trigger when things obviously aren't working out, Henry Cloud’s Necessary Endings may be the most important book you read all year.” —Dave Ramsey, New York Times bestselling author of The Total Money Makeover “Cloud is a wise, experienced, and compassionate guide through [life’s] turbulent passages.” —Bob Buford, bestelling author of Halftime and Finishing Well; founder of the Leadership Network Henry Cloud, the bestselling author of Integrity and The One-Life Solution, offers this mindset-altering method for proactively correcting the bad and the broken in our businesses and our lives. Cloud challenges readers to achieve the personal and professional growth they both desire and deserve—and gives crucial insight on how to make those tough decisions that are standing in the way of a more successful business and, ultimately, a better life.


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“If you’re hesitant to pull the trigger when things obviously aren't working out, Henry Cloud’s Necessary Endings may be the most important book you read all year.” —Dave Ramsey, New York Times bestselling author of The Total Money Makeover “Cloud is a wise, experienced, and compassionate guide through [life’s] turbulent passages.” —Bob Buford, bestelling author of Halftime “If you’re hesitant to pull the trigger when things obviously aren't working out, Henry Cloud’s Necessary Endings may be the most important book you read all year.” —Dave Ramsey, New York Times bestselling author of The Total Money Makeover “Cloud is a wise, experienced, and compassionate guide through [life’s] turbulent passages.” —Bob Buford, bestelling author of Halftime and Finishing Well; founder of the Leadership Network Henry Cloud, the bestselling author of Integrity and The One-Life Solution, offers this mindset-altering method for proactively correcting the bad and the broken in our businesses and our lives. Cloud challenges readers to achieve the personal and professional growth they both desire and deserve—and gives crucial insight on how to make those tough decisions that are standing in the way of a more successful business and, ultimately, a better life.

30 review for Necessary Endings: The Employees, Businesses, and Relationships That All of Us Have to Give Up in Order to Move Forward

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Perhaps the best book I've read thus far this year. I highly recommend this book. A few insights: "Getting to the next level always requires something, leaving it behind and moving on. Growth itself demands that we move on. Without the ability to end things, people stay stuck, never becoming who they are meant to be, never accomplishing all that their talents and abilities should afford them." "Good cannot begin until bad ends." Endings are not only part of life, they are a requirement for livin Perhaps the best book I've read thus far this year. I highly recommend this book. A few insights: "Getting to the next level always requires something, leaving it behind and moving on. Growth itself demands that we move on. Without the ability to end things, people stay stuck, never becoming who they are meant to be, never accomplishing all that their talents and abilities should afford them." "Good cannot begin until bad ends." Endings are not only part of life, they are a requirement for living and thriving. "Am I having on to an activity, product, strategy or relationship whose season has passed?" Accept Life Cycles and Seasons. There are the tasks of spring, summer, harvest and winter. Be aware of the seasons. Reality is tough but as Woody Allen said, "Reality is still the only place to get a good steak." Take a piece of paper and divide it in two columns. On the first column write down all the things you don't have control over. On the second column, write down things that you do have control over. Focus on the second column. True hope, true perseverance = a real reason to believe that tomorrow is going to be different from today. The past is the best predictor of the future. FOUR QUESTIONS OF HOPE: 1. What has the performance been so far? 2. Is it good enough? 3. Is there anything in place that would make it different? 4. If not, am I willing to sign up for more of the same? There are three kinds of people: 1. Wise people -- they welcome constructive feedback. 2. Foolish people -- they reject constructive feedback. 3. Evil people -- they destroy. Have nothing to do with them. The mature person meets the demands of life, while the immature person demands that life meet their demands.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    I should just buy this book, and highlight. I find it sometimes hard to read books by Henry Cloud, and this one seemed mostly applicable to business, but the more I read, the more helpful it was. Following are the most helpful (to me) excerpts: page 49: "I have watched well-meaning people literally waste years and millions of dollars trying to bring someone along who is not coming. And often the person may have lots of other talent that the leader doesn't want to lose, or he likes the person so mu I should just buy this book, and highlight. I find it sometimes hard to read books by Henry Cloud, and this one seemed mostly applicable to business, but the more I read, the more helpful it was. Following are the most helpful (to me) excerpts: page 49: "I have watched well-meaning people literally waste years and millions of dollars trying to bring someone along who is not coming. And often the person may have lots of other talent that the leader doesn't want to lose, or he likes the person so much that he is willing to try over and over again...come to grips with the fact that some people--no matter how much you give them or how much you try to help them improve their performance...are not going to change. At least not now, and not as a result of anything you are doing. Accept it..." page 66-67: "Another relational map is feeling responsible for another person's pain when the enabling is ended...it is a form of caring gone awry. People enable others because they care. But this kind of caring is not caring at all and is destructive to the person being helped. It is a toxic dependency. It keeps adult kids dependent on parents long after they should have been independent adults...there is a difference between helping someone who is disabled, incapable, or otherwise infirm versus helping someone who is resisting growing up and taking care of what every adult (or child, for that matter) has to be responsible for: herself or himself. When you find yourself in any way paying for someone else's responsibilities, not only are you stuck with a delayed ending, but you are probably harming that person." Page 69: "In the family-owned businesses, the failure-to-launch syndrome can become a business practice...people in their twenties or older, who are living with parents and have not been able to successfully launch into adulthood. Certainly there are circumstances in which living with parents makes sense...But sometimes the situation is not good and enables a child-like dependency in an adult. (In some situations, you cannot even call it a healthy childlike dependency, as many times these twenty-somethings have no chores, requirements, or reponsibilities, not is their living with parents in service of anything else, like further education.) Page 74: "...successful people...all have one thing in common: They get in touch with reality...you must finally see reality for what it is...what is not working is not going to magically being working...The awareness of hopelessness is what finally brings people to the reality of the pruning moment. It is the moment when they wake up, realize that an ending must occur, and finally feel energized to do it. Nothing mobilizes us like a firm dose of reality. Whether is is finally getting an addict to hit bottom and end a destructive pattern or getting a CEO in front of a bankruptcy judge to force the restructuring that he has been avoiding, only reality gets us to do difficult things." Page 87 ff: "It is imperative that you give up hope if your hope is not hope at all but just an empty wish. But how do we know the difference between wishing and hoping?...definitions of hope contain two elements..."desire or expectation" for something in the future to occur...second is..."grounds for believing" that something...will occur...The real problem is when have have one without the other: a desire without any grounds. That is hope based not on reality but on our desires, our wishes...In the absence of real, objective reasons to think that more time is going to help, it is probably time for some type of necessary ending...As the saying goines, "Hope is not a strategy." This kind of hope is not worth spending more time and resources on. It is only buying you the time to continue to make more mistakes. If you are in a hole, rule number one is to stop digging...While hope is a great virtue, hope in unreality is not. And sometimes hopeless is the best virtue you have, because it can finally get you to the pruning moment...to hang on to false hope is a fantasy that can end in dismal failure." Page 92: "The past is the best predictor." Page 95: "The past does not lie. Of course, you might...ask, "Can't someone do better than their past?" Of course!...the key is this: There had better be good reason to believe that someone is going to do better. Without any new information or actions, though, the past is the best predictor of the future." Page 96: "...am I willing to sign up for more of the same?" Page 97: "I was talking to a wealthy friend one time about the ways that he invests his money...He told me that he does not invest in businesses, other than his own...I disagreed, as I knew of several that he had invested in..."Not true," he said, "I did not invest in those businesses...What I invested in was what I always invest in: the person...I knew the leader and his or her team, their track record, and their character. That is what I was investing in, not the business..."...What kind of person deserves our trust, and when do we believe that someone can change?" Page 99: "...unless something changes, the future that you can expect is more of the past. Sorry or becoming committed does not make Jim Carrey a great golfer, or made Jack nicklaus funny. Recommitment does not make a person who is unsuited for a particular position suited for it all of a sudden. Promises by someone who has a history of letting you down in a relationship mean nothing certain in terms of the future." Page 102 ff: "People change...But...not always...you can waste more time, even years...when can I have hope that a person is going to be different...look for the objective reasons to hope...You need a "reason to believe". Here are nine object factors...Verifiable Involvement in a Proven Change Process; Additional Structure; Monitoring Systems; New Experiences and Skills; Self-sustaining motivation...Look at the degree to which you are having to drive the process; Admission of Need; The Presence of Support; Skilled Help; Some Success." Page 133: "...the foll...rejects the feedback, resists it, explains it away, and does nothing to adjust to meet its requirements. In short, The fool tries to adjust the truth so he does not have to adjust to it." Page 134-5: "Traits of Foolish Persons. When given feedback, they are defensive...come back at you with a reason why it is not their fault...When a mistake is pointed out, they externalize the mistake and blame someone else...attempts to talk about problems create conflict, alienation, or a breach in the relationship...Sometimes, they immediately shift the blame to you...use minimization...rationalize...excuses are rampant...never take ownership...emotional response has nothing to do with remorse; instead they get angry at you for being on their case...see themselves as the victim...world is divided into the good guys and the bad guys. The good guys are the ones who agree with them and see them as good, and the bad ones are the ones who don't think that they are perfect...lack of ownership of the issue and a refusal to take responsibility...want outside world to change instead of them." Page 137: "So stop talking. At least about the problem." Page 142: "When a spouse says to the alcoholic, "you need to go to AA," that is obviously not true. The addict feels no need to do that at all, and isn't. But when she says, "I am moving out and will be open to getting back together when you are getting treatment for your addiction," then all of a sudden the addict feels "I need to get some help or I am going to lose my marriage." The need has been transferred. It is the same with any kind of problematic behavior of a person who is not taking feedback and ownership. The need and drive to do something about it must be transferred to that person, and that is done through having consequences that finally make him feel the pain instead of others. When he feels the pain, he will feel the need to change...A plan that has hope is one that limits your exposure to the foolish person's issues and forces him to feel the consequences of his performance so that he might have hope of waking up and changing." Page 143: "With wise people, talk to them, give them resources, and you will get a return. With foolish people, stop talking to them about problems; they are not listening. And stop supplying resources; they squander them. Instead give them limits and consequences. With evil people, to quote a Warren Zevon song, the strategy is "Lawyers, Guns and Money."...You have to go into protection mode, not helping mode...I use that phrase to symbolize resources that you use to protect yourself...The bottom line with evil is to stay away, create the firmest protective ending that you can, and get real help to do it. Use your lawyers, law enforcement (that is the guns part), and your financial resources to make sure that you will not be hurt by someone who is trying to destroy you...do not talk to evil people at all, period. "You can communicate with me through my attorney" is a phrase that exists for a reason." Page 174: "Getting people to finally see the stark incompatibility of certain desires is often what finally gets them unstuck...I met a woman who defined herself as stuck. She was in a relationship that was not all that she wanted...He did not have the "drive" that she desired...So when I asked her why she didn't go after the kind that she wanted, she would say, "because I want him. I love him." "But I though you wanted someone who was more like the driver...type," I said. "I do...But he is so great is other ways...I want to be with him, too," she said. "Too?"...sometimes we want two or more things that can't coexist...incompatible wishes...Part of maturity is getting to the place where we can let go of one wish in order to have another. The immature mind "wants it all." But...most valuable things come with a cost...we have to give up some things for others." Page 182: "If you are going to do it "later," then when will that be? Set a date. What real reason do you have for waiting?...If there is not a real contingency, then why are you waiting?" Page 186: "The maturity to discern when to remain invested in a relationship or situation and when to let go of one is the same. You have to be able to see the whole reality in both situations, the one that you keep and the one that you don't. Otherwise, lasting relationships cannot happen, and bad ones cannot end...we are willing to deal with the negatives to have the positives...commitment...if we...don't love it...ending needed..." Page 195: "He would be the one to decide whether or not he wanted to be with her. She set the standards for what being with her meant, and he could decide whether or not it was a match. It was his decision, and he could self-select. Good for her as she did not have to judge anymore. Instead, her standards would be the judge. Good for him, as she was no longer going to nag but instead would let him decide whether or not he wanted to be with her in the ways that she required. No bad guy anywhere. Everyone was free again." Page 197 ff: "Self-selection for yourself works the same way. Set the standard: "If the business has not turned aprofit by the end of this year, I shut it down."...I live in L.A. and know many people...trying to make it in the entertainment or music industry...When to quit?...have a date out there...it is a good idea to know how much of your life or resources you want to spend on something before you lose them all..." Page 204: "...when someone cares about how a person feels, there is the temptation to go squishy on the truth, because the truth hurts. So we tend to get a bit codependent in these kinds of conversations...truth suffers, and often the ending gets flimsy...on the other hand, if you are insensitive to people and just interested in the "truth"...you might really hurt someone needlessly...it is still to your advantage to get this right and begin to care, because if you don't, it has a much greater chance of going bad...If something is not right for one party, it is not right for the other one, either...The truth is painful but best in the end." Page 208: "Many times...the person will not like hearing what you are saying...But the only person you can control in the conversation is yourself, so stay on message. Whether or not she gets it is not in your control. But remaining empathetic and clear is in your control...Sometimes there is so much danger of distortion...that you should make sure that you have someone in the conversation with you...related to this is the need for good notes and immediate documentation of what occurred...The better the documentaiton...the better off you will be. Judges and juries will be impressed with the one who has a clear, provable record of the facts." Page 210: "Except in rare cases, don't burn bridges...the person you've just ended something with may be your boss...one day...Above all, don't be squishy...end it and leave it clearly over. Many times people leave a little wiggle room or false hope just to soften the bad news. Do not do that if an ending is what you desire. Otherwise, you are just going to have to do it again...Close it now..." Page 226: "...watch out for those situations in life...that diminish you or your assets over time. That should be an alarm to move immediately to stop the outflow, reorganize, bring in some sort of help, make a change, or do some kind of ending...end at least the dynamic that is unsustainable."

  3. 4 out of 5

    June Sparks

    This is a book to read slowly....very slowly. Read Chapter One and then spend a week thinking about it. Do that for each chapter - meditate on it. There is so much good advice dripping from every page. So many times, change = loss in life. Many times the change is necessary, whether it be moving to a new place, taking a new job or cutting ties with someone in your life. We mourn the loss created by the change, whether the change was good or not. This book provides insight into our feelings and m This is a book to read slowly....very slowly. Read Chapter One and then spend a week thinking about it. Do that for each chapter - meditate on it. There is so much good advice dripping from every page. So many times, change = loss in life. Many times the change is necessary, whether it be moving to a new place, taking a new job or cutting ties with someone in your life. We mourn the loss created by the change, whether the change was good or not. This book provides insight into our feelings and makes it easier to swallow the loss - or better yet - deal with it positively.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ann Jones

    Thank you Henry Cloud. Much needed solid advice! One of my favorite quotes from the book, “There is a difference between helping someone who is disabled, incapable, or otherwise infirm versus helping someone who is resisting growing up and taking care of what every adult (or child, for that matter) has to be responsible for: herself or himself. When you find yourself in any way paying for someone else’s responsibilities, not only are you stuck with a delayed ending, but you are probably harming Thank you Henry Cloud. Much needed solid advice! One of my favorite quotes from the book, “There is a difference between helping someone who is disabled, incapable, or otherwise infirm versus helping someone who is resisting growing up and taking care of what every adult (or child, for that matter) has to be responsible for: herself or himself. When you find yourself in any way paying for someone else’s responsibilities, not only are you stuck with a delayed ending, but you are probably harming that person.” - Henry Cloud Necessary Endings: The Employees, Businesses, and Relationships That All of Us Have to Give Up in Order to Move Forward

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    This is a must read! A truly excellent book full of wisdom. True, endings are necessary and they do take courage and faith, and this book is one to help you through it. Take courage, endings are not all bad and they are indeed very, very necessary. This book will remain on my shelf for the rest of my days. I will read it again and refer to it often.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Steve Poling

    This book is about ending relationships between people. Saying that brings to mind romantic relationships, but this book applies equally to business relationships as romantic ones. Should you quit that job? Should you leave that church? Should you break up with that girl? Should you fire that employee? Should you excommunicate that parishioner? Should you divorce that spouse? These questions are answered in the affirmative when it is a "necessary ending" to the relationship. Thus it's important to This book is about ending relationships between people. Saying that brings to mind romantic relationships, but this book applies equally to business relationships as romantic ones. Should you quit that job? Should you leave that church? Should you break up with that girl? Should you fire that employee? Should you excommunicate that parishioner? Should you divorce that spouse? These questions are answered in the affirmative when it is a "necessary ending" to the relationship. Thus it's important to understand whether the ending is necessary or not. I believe that one should manage all his relationships in a sustainable fashion so that ending a relationship generally won't happen unless it is necessary. To assist in figuring whether a relationship is at a necessary ending, Cloud partitions humanity into three classes: the wise, the fools, and the evil. The wise are people you can share negative facts with and they'll respond gratefully. ("You have bad breath." / "Oh, sorry. Here I'll take a mint. Is that better?") The fools are people who edit their perceptions of reality to remove the parts they don't like. ("Your software has a bug." / "No, it doesn't. You're not using it right. That's not my problem.") When dealing with a fool you have to change the conversation from the problem at hand to why they're not listening. The evil are people who will use whatever you give them against you. For these people you send "lawyers, guns, and money" and get away from them. Recognizing where you are in this continuum and recognizing where those you deal with are on it serves to guide in evaluating one's relationships. It's a negative book for negative times when one may have to painfully choose to give up on a hopeless business or dismiss a marginal employee. Recommended.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Petersen Wolven

    To get to the new beginning you need to make the necessary ending first. I wish I had read the book 20 years ago. He makes the point that in the day-to-day, it isn't too hard to put up with something that is no longer right for us. We make it through one day, then another, and the days turn into years. We have an incredible tolerance for pain, especially if we think it will "get better." So, we tell ourselves little lies like "It will turn around" or "it's not always like this." We numb ourselve To get to the new beginning you need to make the necessary ending first. I wish I had read the book 20 years ago. He makes the point that in the day-to-day, it isn't too hard to put up with something that is no longer right for us. We make it through one day, then another, and the days turn into years. We have an incredible tolerance for pain, especially if we think it will "get better." So, we tell ourselves little lies like "It will turn around" or "it's not always like this." We numb ourselves as a method of coping. So, here is the part that got to me: "Then, stop the excusing, the medicating, the rationalizing, or any other interference, and project into the future: one month, six months, one year, two years, five years, or more. See yourself at that time having the same discussions you are having now, with no better results. Picture it, feel it, smell it. You already know what it is like, so you don't even have to use your imagination. You are living it right now. I just want you to picture yourself living it for real five years from now. Is that what you want?"

  8. 4 out of 5

    John

    AMAZING. Riveting, foundation-shifting and freeing. Of the 28 books I have read so far this year, this book is the clear #1. Necessary Endings and Made to Stick are the best of the best I have read so far this year, and Necessary Endings is by far the #1 of those 2. And of the books I have read in the last 10 years, this is in the top 5, for sure. Hope and perseverance are viewed as positive characteristics, and they generally are. But there are times when we have false hopes and persevere in the AMAZING. Riveting, foundation-shifting and freeing. Of the 28 books I have read so far this year, this book is the clear #1. Necessary Endings and Made to Stick are the best of the best I have read so far this year, and Necessary Endings is by far the #1 of those 2. And of the books I have read in the last 10 years, this is in the top 5, for sure. Hope and perseverance are viewed as positive characteristics, and they generally are. But there are times when we have false hopes and persevere in the wrong pursuit -- in those times, those characteristics bind us, demotivate us, and hold us back. Good endings are not a strength of many people, but Dr. Cloud brings a normalcy to endings: whether it is cycles of life or seasons or the healthy passing of life or times in life (infancy, childhood, singlehood, etc.), endings are healthy and good. And dealing with them well is so important. Wise, Foolish and Evil. Decathexis, funerals, metabolizing. So many, many good concepts. Don't stay stuck and don't persevere on a false hope.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Vicki

    I'm not sure why I felt it was important to read this, but I did. I admittedly fought the ideas in the book for almost the entire first half. I could see where this might be important for business leaders and that part made sense. However, I felt it was too simplistic for relationships. After all, relationships are more nuanced and complex. Plus, as a person of faith, I feel like I'm told never to give up on people since God never gave up on us. Where is the love, faith and hope in giving up or I'm not sure why I felt it was important to read this, but I did. I admittedly fought the ideas in the book for almost the entire first half. I could see where this might be important for business leaders and that part made sense. However, I felt it was too simplistic for relationships. After all, relationships are more nuanced and complex. Plus, as a person of faith, I feel like I'm told never to give up on people since God never gave up on us. Where is the love, faith and hope in giving up or becoming hopeless? The book didn't seem to make very strong connections between the two and gave me plenty of space to negate the ideas. Then came chapters 6 and 7 and I found myself seeing such familiarity that I didn't have as much space anymore. I found myself sadly agreeing that some relationships that just ended were necessary endings. This book helped me see how much energy I was spending in a situation that wasn't going to change, at least not any time soon, and that was energy that could be spent on things that would bear more fruit. An even harder realization was in how much energy another person was having to spend on me, not to have any forward momentum. We were causing each other to get stuck. A bit of an ouch, but a necessary ouch. According to the book, I haven't been horrible at saying good-bye in the right way, but I haven't been great at it either. I agree. It was helpful to read the chapters on how to possibly go about it that would bring about health and closure. I think a bigger take-away was that endings are new beginnings, which I assume could also mean a full circle back around once all of us have grown and matured a little. However, the book points to signs as to whether that is possible or not. I guess I would prefer, at least when it comes to relationships, that it was titled, Necessary So-Longs. However, if we never take that step we will never get to that place where there is any kind of health. There is a no-nonsense type of approach here that my sensitive nature had to adjust to a bit, but it wasn't too difficult. I listened to the title on Audible but have now bought a Kindle copy so I can refer to the chapters with questions to ask if I ever feel the doubt about saying "so-long" again. This was very helpful.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kent

    Helpful coverage of the internal and external aspects of bringing closure to life's passing experiences. With eternity set in the human heart by our Creator, we naturally find it difficult to bring an end to things that have out lived their useful life. Cloud helps navigate the complicated landscape of what I heard Peter Drucker call "Systematic Abandonment." Drucker said, "For every new thing I pick up, I must ask myself, "What will I set down?"" Necessary Endings shatters the "no one has ever be Helpful coverage of the internal and external aspects of bringing closure to life's passing experiences. With eternity set in the human heart by our Creator, we naturally find it difficult to bring an end to things that have out lived their useful life. Cloud helps navigate the complicated landscape of what I heard Peter Drucker call "Systematic Abandonment." Drucker said, "For every new thing I pick up, I must ask myself, "What will I set down?"" Necessary Endings shatters the "no one has ever been down this trail before" fear and replaces it with the faith to walk a path of closure with the millions of folks who have made necessary endings.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cyrus Carter

    If you are contemplating a change in your life, this book may help structure some of your thinking. Whether professional or personal, any change requires an "ending" which can be difficult but will likely be liberating in the end. I recommend the book for its ability to add a sequence to the process; I do wish the editor had taken a red pen to about 25% of the material as it was repetitious at times.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Neil R. Coulter

    When I was in administration, I regularly read leadership books. Most are not great, many are repetitive (that is, repeating what's in other leadership books, or repeating itself within the same book. Steven Covey does all of that!), and it was rare to find one that's helpful, well-written, and thought-provoking. One of the books that met that standard was Henry Cloud's Integrity. Cloud is a good author, very grounded not only in reality but also in compassion. It's been some years since I read i When I was in administration, I regularly read leadership books. Most are not great, many are repetitive (that is, repeating what's in other leadership books, or repeating itself within the same book. Steven Covey does all of that!), and it was rare to find one that's helpful, well-written, and thought-provoking. One of the books that met that standard was Henry Cloud's Integrity. Cloud is a good author, very grounded not only in reality but also in compassion. It's been some years since I read in the leadership genre, but Cloud's book Necessary Endings has been on my shelf for a while, and it was recently brought to my attention and recommended. So I opened it up, and I'm glad I did. I found Cloud's advice and experiences extremely helpful at a time in my life when I've got some "necessary endings" that need to happen. Reading the book helped me analyze some situations and create plans to make changes for the good. Cloud's guidance to consider whether the person you're dealing with is "wise," "foolish," or "evil" (the actual chapter is more nuanced than that list makes it sound) is a really great way to make sure you're not wasting effort—or even just the mental strain of caring about a situation in a certain way—on someone who doesn't even see the world the same way you do, as far as responsibilities and integrity. Most of the book is about the business/workplace context, but there is also quite a bit of content that's relevant to other areas of life. I wish that it was a little less focused on just business, because what Cloud writes is incredibly relevant to a lot of situations, and people who need the advice might miss it because it's in a leadership book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Drew

    While there was a lot of helpful, practical information in this book, it has some fundamental flaws. Cloud speaks to the necessity of gathering some fortitude and dropping the ax on certain toxic initiatives and people in our lives in order to move forward to healthier beginnings. In many ways, this is very true. However, the methods he employs here are not altogether healthy. Cloud's approach to endings, especially as it concerns other people, are more retributive than restorative. While I sympa While there was a lot of helpful, practical information in this book, it has some fundamental flaws. Cloud speaks to the necessity of gathering some fortitude and dropping the ax on certain toxic initiatives and people in our lives in order to move forward to healthier beginnings. In many ways, this is very true. However, the methods he employs here are not altogether healthy. Cloud's approach to endings, especially as it concerns other people, are more retributive than restorative. While I sympathize with the need to cut the head off of certain programs and initiatives that stray from an organization's mission, I cannot sympathize with his view of human beings in the same way. To be sure, there are people in our lives whose behavior is hurtful. However, the pink slip is not a cure all, as Cloud universally suggests in this book. Now I know that employee development is not cheap or efficient, but it is respectful, and it allows the person to decide for him- or herself whether or not he or she is "with the program". It can also be done in such a way that it does not enable bad behaviors of such employees. Cloud does appear to support the reader undergoing personal development, but is not willing to extend this to employees who may not be cutting the mustard. Furthermore, where is a chapter in this book, not about endings, but about making the right beginning, the right hire? While Cloud rightly instructs us to get tough and think more habitually about endings, this reader wants to balance that with a healthy dose of respect toward my fellow human being.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ericka E

    What a great book for the everyday working person. We don’t see how important some endings are or how to end some things that are long over do. This books really explains the why and how of necessary endings. I enjoyed seeing the different approaches and the views of others. We all tend to feel stuck sometimes and we trying everything to change that but we never think we should end the thing we are stuck in. Seeing how not everyone deserves your trust and how to see which people should be trustw What a great book for the everyday working person. We don’t see how important some endings are or how to end some things that are long over do. This books really explains the why and how of necessary endings. I enjoyed seeing the different approaches and the views of others. We all tend to feel stuck sometimes and we trying everything to change that but we never think we should end the thing we are stuck in. Seeing how not everyone deserves your trust and how to see which people should be trustworthy. My favorite is the last few chapter, it was a perfect closing to this amazing book. Dr. Henry Cloud never disappoints.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anita Howard

    I think this is a great book. Since I am no longer in the workforce, I wanted to skip through some of the business related illustrations, but the personal material was fantastic. I especially liked chapter 7 on. I would love it if Henry Cloud would modify the book so that those of us not dealing with the work sector would be able to benefit as well. I would recommend this book to some people, but I think it is difficult to wade through the business examples. Don't miss the last chapter. It is gr I think this is a great book. Since I am no longer in the workforce, I wanted to skip through some of the business related illustrations, but the personal material was fantastic. I especially liked chapter 7 on. I would love it if Henry Cloud would modify the book so that those of us not dealing with the work sector would be able to benefit as well. I would recommend this book to some people, but I think it is difficult to wade through the business examples. Don't miss the last chapter. It is great.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Stan

    Wow! This is an amazing and extremely important book. It isn't an easy read, because you probably won't progress very far before thinking about aspects of your life that may require a necessary ending. And, that is a huge part of why this is an important book. The author applies his ideas to personal relationships and business decisions and even lifestyle choices. Many examples are given from his decades of counseling and executive coaching. You are likely to find some of your own life experience Wow! This is an amazing and extremely important book. It isn't an easy read, because you probably won't progress very far before thinking about aspects of your life that may require a necessary ending. And, that is a huge part of why this is an important book. The author applies his ideas to personal relationships and business decisions and even lifestyle choices. Many examples are given from his decades of counseling and executive coaching. You are likely to find some of your own life experiences in the examples. This book will help you identify aspects of your life that need to be changed, things that need necessary endings. You will read sage advice on how to determine what can be salvaged and what cannot. Where personal relationships or business relationships are concerned, you will read wise communication strategies. The distinction between wide people, foolish people, and evil people is clear and priceless-the advice on communicating with each type is vital. Where the book really shines is Cloud's writing about why we resist making these necessary endings and how to find the motivation and courage to follow through. This is a great book that presents life skills that everyone needs to master. Hands down - the book is pretty indispensable. Get a copy. Don't just read it, master it! Enjoy!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Larisha

    Author has an easy reading style and he writes with a Christian perspective. In a nutshell necessary endings is removing whatever it is in our lives whose reach is unwanted. I liked how he further broke it down...”given your abilities, resources, opportunities, etc. are you reaching your full potential, or are you drifting toward a middle that is lower than where you should be if you were getting the most from who you are and what you have?” His section on the 3 types of people was excellent. The Author has an easy reading style and he writes with a Christian perspective. In a nutshell necessary endings is removing whatever it is in our lives whose reach is unwanted. I liked how he further broke it down...”given your abilities, resources, opportunities, etc. are you reaching your full potential, or are you drifting toward a middle that is lower than where you should be if you were getting the most from who you are and what you have?” His section on the 3 types of people was excellent. The wise, foolish, and evil.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Demetrius Rogers

    Tempted to give this 5 stars, but felt it could've fit into a 150 page book. Super helpful though and very well executed. A great resource to reference in the future.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Petra Valjan

    Great book, the one to keep and open from time to time to learn more and more. Very useful and insightful.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Good, practical advice about knowing when to end things---whether relationships with people, pet-projects at work, or professional positions. Solid audio, easy to follow and understand.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Incredibly helpful book for both personal and professional life. Thoughtfully written with much practical application. Definitely passing this on to friends and coworkers.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lori Koppelman

    Necessary reading. Especially loved the discussion about wise, foolish and evil people and how to work with them. Good examples throughout.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mikejencostanzo

    I have not yet read this book, but I've read with interest the book description, and would love to read the book itself very soon. One question I'd like to explore in my reading: How does Necessary Endings apply to a situation like that of historic figure Charles Simeon (following taken from a sermon by John Piper): "The vicar of Trinity Church died in October, 1782, just as Charles Simeon was about to leave the university to live in his father's home. Simeon had often walked by the church, he te I have not yet read this book, but I've read with interest the book description, and would love to read the book itself very soon. One question I'd like to explore in my reading: How does Necessary Endings apply to a situation like that of historic figure Charles Simeon (following taken from a sermon by John Piper): "The vicar of Trinity Church died in October, 1782, just as Charles Simeon was about to leave the university to live in his father's home. Simeon had often walked by the church, he tells us, and said to himself, "How should I rejoice if God were to give me that church, that I might preach the Gospel there and be a herald for Him in the University" (Moule, 37). His dream came true when Bishop Yorke appointed him "curate-in-charge" ... He preached his first sermon there November 10, 1782. But the parishioners did not want Simeon. They wanted the assistant curate Mr. Hammond. Simeon was willing to step out, but then the Bishop told him that even if he did decline the appointment he would not appoint Hammond. So Simeon stayed – for fifty-four years! And gradually – very gradually – overcame the opposition. The first thing the congregation did in rebellion against Simeon was to refuse to let him be the Sunday afternoon lecturer ... For five years they assigned the lecture to Mr. Hammond. Then when he left, instead of turning it over to their pastor of five years they gave it to another independent man for seven more years! Finally, in 1794, Simeon was chosen lecturer. Imagine serving for 12 years a church who were so resistant to your leadership they would not let you preach Sunday evenings, but hired an assistant to keep you out. Simeon tried to start a later Sunday evening service and many townspeople came. But the churchwardens locked the doors while the people stood waiting in the street. Once Simeon had the doors opened by a locksmith, but when it happened again he pulled back and dropped the service. The second thing the church did was to lock the pew doors on Sunday mornings. The pewholders refused to come and refused to let others sit in their personal pews. Simeon set up seats in the aisles and nooks and corners at his own expense. But the churchwardens took them out and threw them in the churchyard. When he tried to visit from house to house, hardly a door would open to him. This situation lasted at least ten years. The records show that in 1792 Simeon got a legal decision that the pewholders could not lock their pews and stay away indefinitely. But he didn't use it. He let his steady, relentless ministry of the word and prayer and community witness gradually overcome the resistance. But I mustn't give the impression that all the troubles were over after the first 12 years. After years of peace, in 1812 (after he had been there 30 years!) there were again opponents in the congregation making the waters rough. He wrote to a friend, "I used to sail in the Pacific; I am now learning to navigate the Red Sea that is full of shoals and rocks." Who of us would not have immediately concluded at age 53, after thirty years in one church that an upsurge of opposition is a sure sign to move on? But again he endured patiently and in 1816 he writes that peace had come and the church is better attended than ever." --Jen

  24. 5 out of 5

    Julia Doherty

    Well, this book needs to go into my top ten of all time favourite books. If you are feeling drained by life or by your business then this book is a must read. For me, it clarified some decisions that I have made in the past, which has enabled me to reach the point that I am at today. There was one chapter in the book that resonated with me, and this was the way in which you deal with different people when ending something or trying to implement change. When I reflect on how I have done this in t Well, this book needs to go into my top ten of all time favourite books. If you are feeling drained by life or by your business then this book is a must read. For me, it clarified some decisions that I have made in the past, which has enabled me to reach the point that I am at today. There was one chapter in the book that resonated with me, and this was the way in which you deal with different people when ending something or trying to implement change. When I reflect on how I have done this in the past, I have always managed the process in the way that I personally like to be managed, and now I appreciate that this is not the best way of dealing with the problem. Dr Cloud talks about three types of people:- 1. Wise people - the ones who take on board what you say, learn from it and move on. 2. Foolish people - A fool shoots the messenger, it is never their fault, and they tend to get angry when faced with a difficult solution. These people do not listen, they don't want to talk about it. We have all had to deal with this type of person and the way to manage them when you need to end something that they are doing is to give boundaries and communicate a consequence. 3. Evil people - The evil people intend to destroy things. We have heard of the phrase "bad apple", well sometimes you just need to get rid of the evil people in your life and business, which will enable you to move on. Stop being nice, and just do it. Cut all ties. Don't return emails, phone calls or tweet! Out of sight is out of mind. If you have someone in your life like this then please, please read this book! There was a lot more to this book, and I am now keen to read more of Dr Henry Cloud's work. A good read!

  25. 5 out of 5

    John Majors

    Life is made up of a series of phases. And learning to end each phase well and transition to the next is critical to growth. This is true in your personal life, but in your work life as well. This book gives tools and categories to help one know how to deal with the relationships and challenges that one faces at endings. But he also helps one see the great benefit of endings. Endings are not inherently bad - because moving on from one setting can open a door to a new and better setting.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Akilah

    Me: I have been reading this book forever. I am going to finish it today because I am sick of saying I'm still reading it. Mom: Sounds like you need to make a necessary ending on that book. Me: Yes, exactly. There is a lot of really useful and helpful information in this book, and I got a lot out of it. Most of it is stuff I had already learned, but I did learn some new strategies and think about some situations differently, both in the NE group I was in that made me decide to read the book and in Me: I have been reading this book forever. I am going to finish it today because I am sick of saying I'm still reading it. Mom: Sounds like you need to make a necessary ending on that book. Me: Yes, exactly. There is a lot of really useful and helpful information in this book, and I got a lot out of it. Most of it is stuff I had already learned, but I did learn some new strategies and think about some situations differently, both in the NE group I was in that made me decide to read the book and in the book itself. For example, I learned that I didn't actually hate my job; I was just burnt out so needed to end some of the practices around it. I also had to make a personal necessary ending, which I probably wouldn't have cast in those terms before. So, you know. Useful. I think it took me so long because the writing is kind of dry and I kept reading it right before bed. Also, I lost the book for about a week, which didn't help with the whole finishing it part. But it's done now, and that's all that matters. If you're trying to figure out how to end something you know you need to but don't know how, this book may be helpful to you and I recommend it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gail Welborn

    Necessary Endings, by Dr. Henry Cloud, Harper Business, 2011, 256 Pages, ISBN-13: 978-0061777127, $25.99 "Toxic, hurtful or problematic" describes many personal or business relationships that should end, writes Dr. Henry Cloud in his new release, Necessary Endings. Whether from fear, regret, anticipated consequences or conflict that might arise from life-altering decisions, unhealthy relationships continue. Dr. Cloud, clinical psychologist, leadership coach, and best-selling author of Boundaries, Necessary Endings, by Dr. Henry Cloud, Harper Business, 2011, 256 Pages, ISBN-13: 978-0061777127, $25.99 "Toxic, hurtful or problematic" describes many personal or business relationships that should end, writes Dr. Henry Cloud in his new release, Necessary Endings. Whether from fear, regret, anticipated consequences or conflict that might arise from life-altering decisions, unhealthy relationships continue. Dr. Cloud, clinical psychologist, leadership coach, and best-selling author of Boundaries, argues "personal and professional lives" improve to the extent necessary endings are accomplished. Such endings correct what no longer works and allows room for personal and professional growth. His insightful advice and case studies equip readers to "end pain and foster personal and professional growth." Henry Wadsworth Longfellow writes, "Great is the art of the beginning, but greater is the art of ending." Cloud agrees and explains how to bring about positive endings both personally and professionally...Full Review: http://tinyurl.com/68fh3q9

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Great read - lots of great advice and is helpful in helping you think about all the [un]-necessary "stuff" in your life that you should end or get rid of, which is causing you all kinds of problems. Deals mostly with business-related endings but also touches on personal relationships. In the end, it's about sustainability and and the overall trajectory of our lives - how overwhelmed and/or stressed out are we, over decisions we know we need to make (or perhaps don't know) but for whatever reason Great read - lots of great advice and is helpful in helping you think about all the [un]-necessary "stuff" in your life that you should end or get rid of, which is causing you all kinds of problems. Deals mostly with business-related endings but also touches on personal relationships. In the end, it's about sustainability and and the overall trajectory of our lives - how overwhelmed and/or stressed out are we, over decisions we know we need to make (or perhaps don't know) but for whatever reason are unable to pull the plug. Ending something can be one of the hardest, most difficult things to do but often times these are the most necessary, or critical, decisions that we must learn HOW to make in our lives...especially if we are going to thrive in an increasingly busy, stressed, and sometimes hostile environment.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    A thought provoking book that opens up the reality of people around you and helps you place them in categories: Wise, Foolish and Evil. Learning who falls in these categories teaches you how to and when to make necessary endings with them. Written with a heavy business perspective in mind the book is also useful for everyday relationships. We all need a little friend pruning in our lives and this book is an easy read that teaches you how to make those endings. I found this book to be very applic A thought provoking book that opens up the reality of people around you and helps you place them in categories: Wise, Foolish and Evil. Learning who falls in these categories teaches you how to and when to make necessary endings with them. Written with a heavy business perspective in mind the book is also useful for everyday relationships. We all need a little friend pruning in our lives and this book is an easy read that teaches you how to make those endings. I found this book to be very applicable to my life in both the personal and business realms.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jerry Fultz

    I'm immediately adding this book to the Mount Rushmore of leadership books. It's Top 10 stuff. If you or your organization is stuck, this is how to become unstuck. It validates and expands upon Godin's "Linchpin" and "Switch" by the Heath brothers. These 3 books, along with Lencioni's "The Advantage" provide just about all the fodder needed to advance your organization from here to there. And as we all know, the best leadership books are really the best life books. I've never given a book a high I'm immediately adding this book to the Mount Rushmore of leadership books. It's Top 10 stuff. If you or your organization is stuck, this is how to become unstuck. It validates and expands upon Godin's "Linchpin" and "Switch" by the Heath brothers. These 3 books, along with Lencioni's "The Advantage" provide just about all the fodder needed to advance your organization from here to there. And as we all know, the best leadership books are really the best life books. I've never given a book a higher recommendation than I give to this one. Read it now. Read it often.

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