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Getting Naked: A Business Fable about Shedding the Three Fears That Sabotage Client Loyalty

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Another extraordinary business fable from the New York Times bestselling author Patrick Lencioni Written in the same dynamic style as his previous bestsellers including The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, Lencioni illustrates the principles of inspiring client loyalty through a fascinating business fable. He explains the theory of vulnerability in depth and presents concrete Another extraordinary business fable from the New York Times bestselling author Patrick Lencioni Written in the same dynamic style as his previous bestsellers including The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, Lencioni illustrates the principles of inspiring client loyalty through a fascinating business fable. He explains the theory of vulnerability in depth and presents concrete steps for putting it to work in any organization. The story follows a small consulting firm, Lighthouse Partners, which often beats out big-name competitors for top clients. One such competitor buys out Lighthouse and learns important lessons about what it means to provide value to its clients. Offers a key resource for gaining competitive advantage in tough times Shows why the quality of vulnerability is so important in business Includes ideas for inspiring customer and client loyalty Written by the highly successful consultant and business writer Patrick Lencioni This new book in the popular Lencioni series shows what it takes to gain a real and lasting competitive edge.


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Another extraordinary business fable from the New York Times bestselling author Patrick Lencioni Written in the same dynamic style as his previous bestsellers including The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, Lencioni illustrates the principles of inspiring client loyalty through a fascinating business fable. He explains the theory of vulnerability in depth and presents concrete Another extraordinary business fable from the New York Times bestselling author Patrick Lencioni Written in the same dynamic style as his previous bestsellers including The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, Lencioni illustrates the principles of inspiring client loyalty through a fascinating business fable. He explains the theory of vulnerability in depth and presents concrete steps for putting it to work in any organization. The story follows a small consulting firm, Lighthouse Partners, which often beats out big-name competitors for top clients. One such competitor buys out Lighthouse and learns important lessons about what it means to provide value to its clients. Offers a key resource for gaining competitive advantage in tough times Shows why the quality of vulnerability is so important in business Includes ideas for inspiring customer and client loyalty Written by the highly successful consultant and business writer Patrick Lencioni This new book in the popular Lencioni series shows what it takes to gain a real and lasting competitive edge.

30 review for Getting Naked: A Business Fable about Shedding the Three Fears That Sabotage Client Loyalty

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    "Getting Naked" is a metaphor advanced in a new book by the prolific and insightful Patrick Lencioni, about how to build a culture of client service excellence by helping people shed their fears, baggage, and ego in any business for which dealing with clients is a driver of success. The book, which takes the form of an accessible if sometimes contrived first-person story, focuses on the fears that effect all of us in client service-oriented business: - Fear of losing the business, which often caus "Getting Naked" is a metaphor advanced in a new book by the prolific and insightful Patrick Lencioni, about how to build a culture of client service excellence by helping people shed their fears, baggage, and ego in any business for which dealing with clients is a driver of success. The book, which takes the form of an accessible if sometimes contrived first-person story, focuses on the fears that effect all of us in client service-oriented business: - Fear of losing the business, which often causes us to avoid doing the difficult things that engender greater loyalty and trust with the people we’re trying to serve; - Fear of being embarrassed, which keeps us from sharing original ideas and being truthful about ourselves; and - Fear of feeling inferior, which is about preserving our sense of importance and social standing relative to a client, and which interferes with the ability of a firm to truly put it’s clients interests first. The book goes on to describe a set of cultural values and attitudes that organizations effective in overcoming these fears seem to adhere to: Always consult instead of sell. Give away the business. Tell the kind truth. Enter the danger. Ask dumb questions. Make dumb suggestions. Celebrate your mistakes. Take a bullet for the client. Make everything about the client. Honor the client’s work. Do the dirty work. Admit your weaknesses and limitations. Seems like motherhood and apple pie stuff, I know, but Lencioni does a good job translating each of these ideas into real world examples, things we’ve all done from time to time that interfere with our ability to be truly excellent service providers. Among my faves was a story about a client meeting where a senior executive steps on a subordinate in a way that makes the whole room uncomfortable. Lencioni’s main character watches in horror as someone on the new team he’s inherited after an acquisition stops the meeting to ask, ' “I’m sorry, but I think it’s time we dealt with something, because I don’t think we’re going to make this strategy work if we don’t.” The room was quiet, although I’m pretty sure they had no idea what Amy was about to do. “Mikey, I’m sure you mean well,” She paused long enough for the room to reach a completely new level of silence, and for Mikey to raise her eyebrows. “But when you approach every issue with such…,” she searched for the right word, “…negativity, it’s a real buzz kill for the team.” ' After the initial turbulence support for the consultant grows, [slow clap], you get the picture. I found the book practical and easy, and am now in the process of buying a copy for the whole client services team at Holland-Mark.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Not much new here. Once again a fable to fill enough pages to sell a book. If you are a busy business person, just read the last 20 pages

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ashlee

    Just finished Getting Naked. Ha! I definitely learned some new ways to approach my business. It is a very fast read. Resist operating from a fear of losing business, feeling inferior, or being embarrassed and instead just serve and give to the client. To Get Naked in Business: Always Consult instead of Sell - (Don't be afraid of losing the business.) Give Away the Business - (Just serve and give people what they need!) Tell the Kind Truth - (Give the direct truth in a helpful and kind way.) Enter the Just finished Getting Naked. Ha! I definitely learned some new ways to approach my business. It is a very fast read. Resist operating from a fear of losing business, feeling inferior, or being embarrassed and instead just serve and give to the client. To Get Naked in Business: Always Consult instead of Sell - (Don't be afraid of losing the business.) Give Away the Business - (Just serve and give people what they need!) Tell the Kind Truth - (Give the direct truth in a helpful and kind way.) Enter the Danger - ("Dangerous" situations are really opportunities to add value and build trust.) Ask Dumb Questions Make Dumb Suggestions Celebrate Your Mistakes Take a Bullet for the Client Make Everything about the Client. Honor the Client's Work Do the Dirty Work Admit our Weaknesses and Limitations

  4. 5 out of 5

    Margot Note

    Read this afternoon, feeling as though I was playing hooky from my "real" consulting work, but it was just what I needed to read as a consultant and business owner. (Between readings, I pitched the first phase of a potentially long-term project with a client I'm delighted to work with--so there's that!) The Three Fears: #1: Fear of losing the business #2: Fear of being embarrassed #3: Fear of feeling inferior The principles of naked service: Always consult instead of sell Give away the business Tell the Read this afternoon, feeling as though I was playing hooky from my "real" consulting work, but it was just what I needed to read as a consultant and business owner. (Between readings, I pitched the first phase of a potentially long-term project with a client I'm delighted to work with--so there's that!) The Three Fears: #1: Fear of losing the business #2: Fear of being embarrassed #3: Fear of feeling inferior The principles of naked service: Always consult instead of sell Give away the business Tell the kind truth Enter the danger Ask dumb questions Make dumb suggestions Celebrate your mistakes Take a bullet for the client Make everything about the client Honor the client's work Do the dirty work Admit your weaknesses and limitations

  5. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Our agency has recently moved to an Account Management/Project Management model for account service. Instead of tiers within the account service structure - we now have people who focus on the business needs partnered with those focused on the operational work needed to produce outstanding marketing materials for our client. In an effort to develop a stronger account management culture here, we're reading a few books to help us grow in this regard. This is the latest one and, so far, the best. F Our agency has recently moved to an Account Management/Project Management model for account service. Instead of tiers within the account service structure - we now have people who focus on the business needs partnered with those focused on the operational work needed to produce outstanding marketing materials for our client. In an effort to develop a stronger account management culture here, we're reading a few books to help us grow in this regard. This is the latest one and, so far, the best. For me, it is most relevant because we've also been discussing Leadership practices and the strongest value that our leadership team needs to develop here is "vulnerability." We need to lose a number of fears - all of which are addressed in this book. They are 1) Fear of Losing the Business, 2) Fear of Being Embarrassed and 3) Fear of Feeling Inferior. While this "loss" is a work in progress here at my agency, I can already feel a sense of liberation in letting go and just being in the moment with my clients, knowing that I bring a unique perspective to any situation and that I need to share that perspective. It may not always be "right," but it will be helpful nonetheless. At a minimum, it will start engaging and collaborative conversations that will lead to the best decision for my client's business. Another strong factor in this book is that it is told in a fable. I, personally, learn more when the teaching is within a story. Because of this book's format - I feel I can relate to the example better and therefore, put the teaching into action sooner. If you read it, let me know what you think. Enjoy!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Huff

    This was a well written and easy to consume book. A refreshing narrative for a self-help / sales book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alwaled Hakamei

    Coming from a consulting background in the middle east I can definitely relate to the book. The book tells a fable about Jack Power a Senior Consultant in prestigious consulting firm who acquired a small consulting firm called Lighthouse and he was assigned responsible for the integration. Jack faces a challenge represented in the cultural differences between the two companies (Traditional consulting vs Lighthouse way). As jack dives deep in lighthouse approach he finds it more successful and mo Coming from a consulting background in the middle east I can definitely relate to the book. The book tells a fable about Jack Power a Senior Consultant in prestigious consulting firm who acquired a small consulting firm called Lighthouse and he was assigned responsible for the integration. Jack faces a challenge represented in the cultural differences between the two companies (Traditional consulting vs Lighthouse way). As jack dives deep in lighthouse approach he finds it more successful and more sustainable as it focuses on long-term relationships based on honesty and being direct with their clients. Jack started asking himself how they do it without any second thoughts? He is conclusion lighthouse consultants are okay with being vulnerable and they don't have any of the following fears (which typical Consultants have): 1) The fear of losing business 2) The fear of being embarrassed 3) The fear of being inferior. I recommend the audio version of the book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brian Lawrence

    Probably one of the best books on management consulting that I’ve read to date. Written as a fable, and citing Lencioni’s own strategies for consulting, this book is a page turner. I blame the author for making me lose sleep the night I decided to pick this up because I could not put it down. I had to get to the end of the book and it was the very early hours of the morning before I finally conceded I needed sleep. Easy to understand principles, maybe not so easy to Implement unless you’re willi Probably one of the best books on management consulting that I’ve read to date. Written as a fable, and citing Lencioni’s own strategies for consulting, this book is a page turner. I blame the author for making me lose sleep the night I decided to pick this up because I could not put it down. I had to get to the end of the book and it was the very early hours of the morning before I finally conceded I needed sleep. Easy to understand principles, maybe not so easy to Implement unless you’re willing to put aside your ego and sales face when you’re working with clients. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    All consultants should read this one! Short read really enjoyed it and it just confirms I’m with the right company.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    This book tells how consultants can forge better client relationships by being vulnerable. Vulnerable, or “naked,” service is characterized by uncommon levels of humility, selflessness, and transparency for the clients’ good. It tells how to be more like team members than vendors. The result is work that’s more enjoyable, profitable, and rewarding. It explains three fears that hold consultants back, and how to overcome these fears. Written as a fable, it’s short, but still longer than necessary. I This book tells how consultants can forge better client relationships by being vulnerable. Vulnerable, or “naked,” service is characterized by uncommon levels of humility, selflessness, and transparency for the clients’ good. It tells how to be more like team members than vendors. The result is work that’s more enjoyable, profitable, and rewarding. It explains three fears that hold consultants back, and how to overcome these fears. Written as a fable, it’s short, but still longer than necessary. I agreed with most of the advice. The main point that I questioned was the recommendation to start consulting in the initial meeting, before arranging an agreement or fees. I can only see that working for certain consulting services and if the client is pre-qualified. I look forward to using the advice to improve the way we consult in my web design agency, OptimWise. Notes “[E]ven though clients require us to be competent enough to meet their needs, it is ultimately our honesty, humility, and selflessness that will endear us to them and allow them to trust and depend on us.” Fear #1: Fear of losing the business Don't worry about closing the deal or losing the client. Be so focused on the client’s interests that you stop worrying about repercussions. Clients want to know you're more interested in helping them than in making money. Consult, don't sell. Give away the business. At initial meeting, be a consultant, not a salesman. Help, don't sell. Skip the sales process. Don't start with presentations and proposals. Instead, ask about prospect’s issues, and brainstorm. Do collaborative, real-time client research rather than preparing an answer ahead of time. Don’t try to outsmart the client, just start consulting. Don't tell what you’d do if hired; just start serving as if they've hired you. Don't bring up fees unless they ask. Once a prospect shows a real interest in becoming a client, focus on their issues and determining if they’d be a good client before jumping to sign a deal. Bringing up the deal can shift focus from their issues to what you want out of the arrangement. Don't be afraid of helping too much during initial sales call. Most clients won't use your advice without hiring you. Those that do would be bad clients anyway. Err on the side of the client when it comes to fees, to build a long-term relationship. Tell the kind truth Give feedback with the empathy and concern of a friend. If you're not willing to tell a client the kind truth, why should they pay you? Fear #2: Fear of being embarrassed (intellectual pride) Ask dumb questions Don't pretend to know than you know more than you do. Make dumb suggestions Clients don't mind sifting through some bad suggestions if they're offered with good intentions. Clients want to hear all your suggestions and want transparency and honesty more than intelligence. Celebrate your mistakes Admit it was a bad idea and laugh. Fear #3: Fear of feeling inferior (preserving social standing related to client) Clients trust and respect service providers who act as servants. Misc. Once you build a relationship with the client, they rarely mention your fees. Of course, some can't afford you. A bad client is worse than no client, because they prevent you from finding good clients, don't give good references, and make you dread work. This method will result in getting most of your business from referrals and warm leads. This method is less professional, less sophisticated, less rigorous, and less systematic, but more effective. Clients will love you and refer others. Don't tell clients how to run their business, or try to convince them that you know more than them.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tommy Kiedis

    In typical and enjoyable fashion, Patrick Lencioni spins another leadership fable with keen insights for leaders and the organizational cultures they seek to build. Pat's business fable about Jack Bauer is my favorite. It's a great story that teaches and illustrates the importance of vulnerability while thoroughly entertaining via a believable page-turner. This book is personal in that Lencioni shares his background, including the reason behind the birth of The Table Group.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Peter Krol

    Lencioni has a way of taking very simple principles and applying them to business situations in a profound way. Although he writes secular business books, Lencioni gives glory to God the Father through Jesus Christ in his acknowledgments. I don't always agree with everything, but I am amazed by what the application of a few biblical principles can do when one takes Paul seriously and gives "glory to God" in "whatever" he does. In this case, Lencioni proposes a method of consulting that he calls " Lencioni has a way of taking very simple principles and applying them to business situations in a profound way. Although he writes secular business books, Lencioni gives glory to God the Father through Jesus Christ in his acknowledgments. I don't always agree with everything, but I am amazed by what the application of a few biblical principles can do when one takes Paul seriously and gives "glory to God" in "whatever" he does. In this case, Lencioni proposes a method of consulting that he calls "naked consulting." This approach can apply to any field where one person is having dealing with another person. The method is not complicated and boils down to being open and transparent with others. Amazing. Novel. At points, Lencioni even uses biblical language like "put the needs of others above your own." What I found most helpful was the fact that Lencioni identifies the failure to be transparent as being motivated by fear. Fear of losing their business. Fear of being embarrassed. Fear of feeling inferior. Another way we could view these fears are fear of failure, fear of man, and exalting oneself. We have already found much application of these principles as we work to sell our house and work with potential buyers. I'm sure that nearly anyone could use these principles in nearly any situation where relating to another person is involved. I highly recommend this book. If you've never read a Lencioni book, then you must know that the best part of the book is not the explanation of the model (the last 20 pages) but the fable Lencioni spins to illustrate it (the first 195 pages). This incarnational approach makes the principles more beautiful and the model more persuasive.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Liza Fireman

    In general, I really appreciate Patrick Lencioni's books, but this is not one of them. It is not that interesting, doesn't give insights or approaches that are different from his other books, and not that well written. In addition, I can't stand the fact that Lencioni is pushing religion and its calming affect in some of his books, it doesn't make me feel comfortable, and it is 100% not inclusive. Skip this, read The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable instead. In general, I really appreciate Patrick Lencioni's books, but this is not one of them. It is not that interesting, doesn't give insights or approaches that are different from his other books, and not that well written. In addition, I can't stand the fact that Lencioni is pushing religion and its calming affect in some of his books, it doesn't make me feel comfortable, and it is 100% not inclusive. Skip this, read The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable instead.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Eugene

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. spectacular book about being honest with clients, how the "naked" and open culture may help to compete with established large scale firms. I like characters author developed, the form of the "business tale" helps to see principles applied in the real life with all of the struggles and benefits. also appreciate that author shows that it is almost impossible to install this "naked" culture into the existing "sales oriented" business. Probably large part of it comes from people who fits the culture spectacular book about being honest with clients, how the "naked" and open culture may help to compete with established large scale firms. I like characters author developed, the form of the "business tale" helps to see principles applied in the real life with all of the struggles and benefits. also appreciate that author shows that it is almost impossible to install this "naked" culture into the existing "sales oriented" business. Probably large part of it comes from people who fits the culture and it is a rare case to change the culture without rebuilding the team (5 Dysfunctions of Team book is about this too).

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Briones

    This book is a must read for people in service-oriented work. (I myself am a software consultant) The format, fictional story/object lesson, is the perfect delivery system for this content as well. If you liked this book, I highly suggest you read Leadership and Self Deception: Getting Out of the Box. Similar format and equally good information for folks in service-oriented work. This book is a must read for people in service-oriented work. (I myself am a software consultant) The format, fictional story/object lesson, is the perfect delivery system for this content as well. If you liked this book, I highly suggest you read Leadership and Self Deception: Getting Out of the Box. Similar format and equally good information for folks in service-oriented work.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kiessa

    This book was recommended to me by a business colleague whom I admire very much. He embodies the principles of the book, and if you have read the book you will recognize how special that is. That said, this book challenges human beings to bring their authenticity and vulnerability to their work, enhancing professional relationships and business transactions. While perhaps not the most revolutionary of ideas, the application of the concept seems to be rare. I couldn't put this book down, and I ca This book was recommended to me by a business colleague whom I admire very much. He embodies the principles of the book, and if you have read the book you will recognize how special that is. That said, this book challenges human beings to bring their authenticity and vulnerability to their work, enhancing professional relationships and business transactions. While perhaps not the most revolutionary of ideas, the application of the concept seems to be rare. I couldn't put this book down, and I can't wait to read it again. It is a real gem.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Natali

    First off, I didn't realize this was a fable until I was done with it. Felt dumb about that. But it almost didn't matter because this book was written as an engaging story with a valuable lesson. It feels more like a novel than a business lesson. This may not be groundbreaking stuff in the realm of personal empowerment but I think it is in the stuffy corporate world. It is a refreshing take on how to be a human being in business and not just a suit. I liked it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ron Mcintyre

    Took me some time to get into it but once I started, I was reminded of similar situations that I have dealt with that had the same types of twisted conversations. I thought for sure that Patrick had been in the room with me during some of those exchanges. It boils down to relationship capital or relationship management, with an operative word of vulnerability and trust.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Randy Fox

    Done as a narrative tale, listening to this book was really excellent and revelatory. Essentially it tells us to throw out sales scripts and manipulative technique and simply to be ourselves. Should be simple but most of us are trained to perform instead of to just be.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Omar U

    Decent read, not as universal as Lencioni's other books. If you're in consulting then it's definitely a must read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mark Wiltshire

    Fantastic view on how to sell without selling, how to approach new clients, and how to build fantastic clients that appreciate and value your services.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael Harden

    I am a huge fan of the author (we worked together at Oracle) and his series of business fables (I have everyone one of his business novels). My first introduction to Getting Naked (and perhaps my favorite) was Five Dysfunctions of a Team, and I was hooked on the engaging style of the Fable. With the first major division of the book relating to a fabricated (but true to life) "story/fable" about a particular institutional or leadership truth, the reader is drawn into the drama and begins to relat I am a huge fan of the author (we worked together at Oracle) and his series of business fables (I have everyone one of his business novels). My first introduction to Getting Naked (and perhaps my favorite) was Five Dysfunctions of a Team, and I was hooked on the engaging style of the Fable. With the first major division of the book relating to a fabricated (but true to life) "story/fable" about a particular institutional or leadership truth, the reader is drawn into the drama and begins to relate. As part of the drama, the reader can participate based on his or her own experiences with the situation. Rarely is there a situation that is completely foreign to the reader. The author then wraps up the book by a more clinical treatment of the subject matter...giving the proposition, the supporting rationale, and intended conclusions. In this book (which caught my attention with the provocative title...otherwise I likely would never have picked it up), Lencioni addresses the institutional assumption that transparency with our clients will reduce the value proposition of our provided service. He speaks of three dominant fears [Fear losing business, fear of being embarrassed, fear of feeling inferior] that often drive a service provider to a position of asserting strength when there is none. This may have been par for the course in a previous generation, but the rapidly shifting landscape of business on a global scale today requires "fresh eyes" on nearly every situation. If a "fear of losing the business" causes a service provider to "play it safe" rather than press hard for a client's benefit...then the service provider has ceased to be a significant value to the client. [Now I will resist the temptation to address all of the material...since doing so might convince you to skip the read entirely]. We live in a culture where transparency (or at least the concept of it) is "in vogue," and therefore is often marketed...even when it is not embraced. Companies/consultants may speak of partnership with a client and a mutual learning experience or "conversation," but what they usually mean is a dedicated vulnerable "moment" before they revert to previous experience, education, history, or models. (This happened recently with a sales professional who called on my company and presented himself as the subject-matter expert on workflow in my business...but really had no experience in my business...only experience selling to other businesses like mine. Because of this book...I spotted the approach (which I have used innumerable times myself) and was better able to position myself in the conversation. So, is the book worth a read? Yes. While I would give it 4.5 stars...there are some who would rate it higher and some a little lower. It provoked an interesting period of self-examination and some points of affirmation...as well as "poked me in the chest" on my approach in some areas. No leader would waste his time by reading this, and I would recommend it without reservation.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Paweł Kołkowski

    1. Fear of loosing the business - no one like to loose client. We must be more interested in helping our client than to maintaining revenue source. Client can smell fear and are repealed by it - like on a date (honest vs desparate guy). 1. Alway serve not sell 2. Giveaway the business - giving advice and service before fee and give up short-term revenue increase for long-term relationship - be more interested in service than in charging client. 3. Tell the kind truth - confront the client wi 1. Fear of loosing the business - no one like to loose client. We must be more interested in helping our client than to maintaining revenue source. Client can smell fear and are repealed by it - like on a date (honest vs desparate guy). 1. Alway serve not sell 2. Giveaway the business - giving advice and service before fee and give up short-term revenue increase for long-term relationship - be more interested in service than in charging client. 3. Tell the kind truth - confront the client with difficult truth even if client don't want to hear it. 4. Enter the danger - In uncomfortable situations step into the center of it and ask dumb question. This is where the best opportunity is. 2. Fear of being embarrassed - no one like to make mistakes. Be eager to ask questions and make suggestions that can turn out to be laughably wrong. Celebrate errors stupid. Transparency and honesty 1. Ask dumb question - be ok with asking evertyhing you don't know - Clients love it if we have the courage to ask them. 2. Make dumb suggestions - Some will turn out to be perfect. Client is going to remember good ideas. 3. Celebrate your mistakes - Increase level of trust, respect and honesty. Acknowledge when mistake is made and apology 3. Fear of feeling inferior - roots in ego. Is not about intellectual pride but rather about preservance of our sense of importance, social standing relative to a client. We try to achieve a certain level of importance but we forgot about service which should be most important. Make the need of others more important than your ego. 1. Take the bullet for the client - finding those moments when we can humble ourselves and sacrificially take some of the burden of a client in difficult situation and then (critical) confront them with the kind truth. Sometimes it will destroy account, but we must do it. 2. Make everything about the client - full attention for a client. Understand, honor and support the client. Downplay your achievements and allow clients to discover them for themselves. 3. Honor the client's work - taking active interest in client's business even if this is something you are not naturally passionate about. 4. Do the dirty work - do everything is needed to do even if it is below your expertise

  24. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    "What clients want more than anything is to know that we're more interested in helping them than we are in maintaining our revenue source. And when we do something, or fail to do something, in order to protect our business, they eventuially lose respect for us and understandably question whether they should trust us." I finished Getting Naked: A Business Fable About Shedding the Three Fears That Sabotage Client Loyalty by Patrick Lencioni. 240 pages, book #18 of 182 (WOO 10% DONE), finished 2/4/2 "What clients want more than anything is to know that we're more interested in helping them than we are in maintaining our revenue source. And when we do something, or fail to do something, in order to protect our business, they eventuially lose respect for us and understandably question whether they should trust us." I finished Getting Naked: A Business Fable About Shedding the Three Fears That Sabotage Client Loyalty by Patrick Lencioni. 240 pages, book #18 of 182 (WOO 10% DONE), finished 2/4/2017. This book tells the fictional story of Jack, who is asked to integrate a small, humble consulting firm into the culture of his much larger and driving consulting firm. Along the way, he learns why this smaller firm's approach is much better than his own. The book is a fictional re-telling of Lencioni's own consulting firm, The Table Group, and is centered on making the case why vulnerability and humility are the keys of client loyalty, satisfaction, and referrals. The three fears that prevent this vulnerability are: 1. The fear of losing the business. 2. The fear of being embarrassed. 3. The fear of feeling inferior. This is the first business book I've read in a while. I tend to grouse about business books, as a substantial number of them are 15 page pamphlets smashed in to a 200 page book, resulting in 100+ pages of pure fluff - anecdotes, repetition to the extreme, and irrelevant words. Lencioni's books aren't like that - this book evenly mixes narrative with guidance, in an engaging and quick way. My main drive for reading this book was my recent role change at work - I spent a large amount of time directly interacting with highly competent business owners and CEO's where there's no chance I can have every answer correct before the question is even asked, I think my main takeaways from the book are: - The three fears should only induce fear if you're incompetent. If you're competent, you have nothing to worry about. - Beginning to consult before a sale is made isn't going to lower the risk of close, it's going to ensure you close the right deals. A client that takes free advice and then doesn't want to pay was never going to be a great client, long-term. I recommend this book to my sales buddy Ryan Bonilla.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Kelsall

    Professionals who may have spent years in the trenches fighting traditional sales wars will likely have one of two reactions to this book: the antagonist company's reaction, Kendrick and Black, a business consulting firm or the protagonist's perspective - Lighthouse Consulting. Lighthouse is a boutique consulting firm that does things in a very unique way - you will see. Although this story is a fable, as is said about fiction, there is usually some element of truth behind it - and alas, the auth Professionals who may have spent years in the trenches fighting traditional sales wars will likely have one of two reactions to this book: the antagonist company's reaction, Kendrick and Black, a business consulting firm or the protagonist's perspective - Lighthouse Consulting. Lighthouse is a boutique consulting firm that does things in a very unique way - you will see. Although this story is a fable, as is said about fiction, there is usually some element of truth behind it - and alas, the author based one company's approach on a real-life example that he created. You will know which is which in short order. Written in the first person, the so-called damsel-in-distress - as all great stories seem to have - is not a woman, but he is still in a state of distress and fits the role well; its the author using a pseudonym. The foreshadowing in this story is relentless, which is a good thing for 217 pages, any longer and it would be too much. The ending is predictable and is in the feel-good category. The overarching lesson that is illustrated here will either infuriate the serious, conservative businessy, sales-shark or provoke head-nodding by the professionals who would like to get the same results from their effort in an open and honest manner; to be naked and vulnerable in their approach and to feel good about what they do. Do the right things for the right reasons and the money will follow. Chase the money and like mercury, it slips from your grasp, not unlike a client that the protagonist picked up for all the wrong/right reason - depending on whose side you are on. It's an old versus new battle that respectively represents the classic good over evil intellectual concept. They say that there are no new stories under the sun and after reading this book, there continues to be no new stories under the sun, but it is refreshing, and how does that other quote go? A change is as good as a rest? I recommend the story if you are tired of sales being "war" and would like to go into the danger areas without fear and with a good conscience.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cori

    What intrigued me: Clayton's boss recommended he read this book before he started working there so I thought I would give it a shot as well. What I liked: I was really engrossed in the story by the ending. Once he finally got to the meat of the model it was a pageturner. It's also short, and Lencioni packs a lot into 217 pages. I was also glad to read that I was already doing some of these things! I learned early on that asking the dumb questions is a-okay and when you're brainstorming there are What intrigued me: Clayton's boss recommended he read this book before he started working there so I thought I would give it a shot as well. What I liked: I was really engrossed in the story by the ending. Once he finally got to the meat of the model it was a pageturner. It's also short, and Lencioni packs a lot into 217 pages. I was also glad to read that I was already doing some of these things! I learned early on that asking the dumb questions is a-okay and when you're brainstorming there are no bad ideas! What I didn't like: This book is akin to The Goal but not as well executed. There is actually one scene about a trust exercise that is almost exactly the same as the one in the Critical Chain. I suppose if a formula works... Favorite quote: "In consulting, entering the danger comes into play in those moments when you’re in a meeting and someone says something that is either strange or politically sensitive, and you know that the level of anxiety and discomfort in the room is high. What you’re tempted to do is just be quiet and let the moment pass, but what great consultants do, at least according to Lighthouse, is walk right into the middle of the situation and call it out.”

  27. 4 out of 5

    Doncho Angelov

    This book is an excellent guide on how to do a better job when working for a third party. Since we all work for third parties, sooner or later, we're tricked into falling into the embrace of the fundamental fears discussed in the book. These fears prevent us from doing the best we could, from being a better version of ourselves, and often from enjoying our work. The model, outlined in the book and complimented with a great story, describes how to identify and battle these fears. It gives straight This book is an excellent guide on how to do a better job when working for a third party. Since we all work for third parties, sooner or later, we're tricked into falling into the embrace of the fundamental fears discussed in the book. These fears prevent us from doing the best we could, from being a better version of ourselves, and often from enjoying our work. The model, outlined in the book and complimented with a great story, describes how to identify and battle these fears. It gives straightforward advice on what to look for and how to avoid it. All of our work is with customers. It doesn't matter if these are external or internal. They're our customers, and they're the reason why we go out there and do what we do. This book teaches us how to be better at handling our business and our customer's business.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jason Carter

    I bought and read this book upon the recommendation of a friend (thanks, Scott!), having read several of Lencioni's books previously. There's no rocket science-based in here. Mostly, it served as confirmation that at least one successful dude thinks about business in much the same way we do. Lencioni uses business fable to illustrate the main point(s) of his books--in this case that "getting naked" (ie being vulnerable) with clients is more important than trying to impress them. This book will be h I bought and read this book upon the recommendation of a friend (thanks, Scott!), having read several of Lencioni's books previously. There's no rocket science-based in here. Mostly, it served as confirmation that at least one successful dude thinks about business in much the same way we do. Lencioni uses business fable to illustrate the main point(s) of his books--in this case that "getting naked" (ie being vulnerable) with clients is more important than trying to impress them. This book will be helpful for me in a couple of ways: 1) as a resource to my company's leaders to illustrate a philosophy of business; and 2) to break down a general philosophy of business into a model with parts that can be taught. Good stuff.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tim Hughes

    I was given a copy of “Getting Naked” as a recommendation. It’s “obviously” an advert for Patrick’s company, but I recommend you take a growth mindset to this and read it. It’s written in the style of a novel, (rather than a set of facts with a narrative) similar to the book “The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement” by Eliyahu M. Goldratt. Which provides a nice backdrop and story. Without offering a spoiler, it takes you through what “good” should look like from a management consulting prospecti I was given a copy of “Getting Naked” as a recommendation. It’s “obviously” an advert for Patrick’s company, but I recommend you take a growth mindset to this and read it. It’s written in the style of a novel, (rather than a set of facts with a narrative) similar to the book “The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement” by Eliyahu M. Goldratt. Which provides a nice backdrop and story. Without offering a spoiler, it takes you through what “good” should look like from a management consulting prospective. That said, the story, like life, isn’t plain sailing and there are some nice twists and turns, which makes the novel more realistic. I’ve purchased a copy for all my members of my Board of Directors

  30. 5 out of 5

    Karsten Lettow

    I really enjoyed reading it and I'm grateful for some of the perspectives the story gave me. The thing that stops me from giving it more stars, the story feels often too artificial for my taste. That, together with the fact that the story is artificial takes away some of the credibility for me. Too good to be true style sometimes, to wrap it up. It's not that I don't believe those things happen, but then I would have rather liked the real world examples. Also, some of the protagonists are quite I really enjoyed reading it and I'm grateful for some of the perspectives the story gave me. The thing that stops me from giving it more stars, the story feels often too artificial for my taste. That, together with the fact that the story is artificial takes away some of the credibility for me. Too good to be true style sometimes, to wrap it up. It's not that I don't believe those things happen, but then I would have rather liked the real world examples. Also, some of the protagonists are quite some stereotypes. With that being said, I still recommend this book to consultants, last but not least because it's a good foundation for healthy discussions.

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