kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

The Laws of Simplicity: Design, Technology, Business, Life

Availability: Ready to download

Ten laws of simplicity for business, technology, and design that teach us how to need less but get more. Finally, we are learning that simplicity equals sanity. We're rebelling against technology that's too complicated, DVD players with too many menus, and software accompanied by 75-megabyte "read me" manuals. The iPod's clean gadgetry has made simplicity hip. But sometimes Ten laws of simplicity for business, technology, and design that teach us how to need less but get more. Finally, we are learning that simplicity equals sanity. We're rebelling against technology that's too complicated, DVD players with too many menus, and software accompanied by 75-megabyte "read me" manuals. The iPod's clean gadgetry has made simplicity hip. But sometimes we find ourselves caught up in the simplicity paradox: we want something that's simple and easy to use, but also does all the complex things we might ever want it to do. In The Laws of Simplicity, John Maeda offers ten laws for balancing simplicity and complexity in business, technology, and design—guidelines for needing less and actually getting more. Maeda—a professor in MIT's Media Lab and a world-renowned graphic designer—explores the question of how we can redefine the notion of "improved" so that it doesn't always mean something more, something added on. Maeda's first law of simplicity is "Reduce." It's not necessarily beneficial to add technology features just because we can. And the features that we do have must be organized (Law 2) in a sensible hierarchy so users aren't distracted by features and functions they don't need. But simplicity is not less just for the sake of less. Skip ahead to Law 9: "Failure: Accept the fact that some things can never be made simple." Maeda's concise guide to simplicity in the digital age shows us how this idea can be a cornerstone of organizations and their products—how it can drive both business and technology. We can learn to simplify without sacrificing comfort and meaning, and we can achieve the balance described in Law 10. This law, which Maeda calls "The One," tells us: "Simplicity is about subtracting the obvious, and adding the meaningful."


Compare
kode adsense disini

Ten laws of simplicity for business, technology, and design that teach us how to need less but get more. Finally, we are learning that simplicity equals sanity. We're rebelling against technology that's too complicated, DVD players with too many menus, and software accompanied by 75-megabyte "read me" manuals. The iPod's clean gadgetry has made simplicity hip. But sometimes Ten laws of simplicity for business, technology, and design that teach us how to need less but get more. Finally, we are learning that simplicity equals sanity. We're rebelling against technology that's too complicated, DVD players with too many menus, and software accompanied by 75-megabyte "read me" manuals. The iPod's clean gadgetry has made simplicity hip. But sometimes we find ourselves caught up in the simplicity paradox: we want something that's simple and easy to use, but also does all the complex things we might ever want it to do. In The Laws of Simplicity, John Maeda offers ten laws for balancing simplicity and complexity in business, technology, and design—guidelines for needing less and actually getting more. Maeda—a professor in MIT's Media Lab and a world-renowned graphic designer—explores the question of how we can redefine the notion of "improved" so that it doesn't always mean something more, something added on. Maeda's first law of simplicity is "Reduce." It's not necessarily beneficial to add technology features just because we can. And the features that we do have must be organized (Law 2) in a sensible hierarchy so users aren't distracted by features and functions they don't need. But simplicity is not less just for the sake of less. Skip ahead to Law 9: "Failure: Accept the fact that some things can never be made simple." Maeda's concise guide to simplicity in the digital age shows us how this idea can be a cornerstone of organizations and their products—how it can drive both business and technology. We can learn to simplify without sacrificing comfort and meaning, and we can achieve the balance described in Law 10. This law, which Maeda calls "The One," tells us: "Simplicity is about subtracting the obvious, and adding the meaningful."

30 review for The Laws of Simplicity: Design, Technology, Business, Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    Erika RS

    This short (100 page) book gives 10 laws and 3 key properties for designing simple systems. Maeda provides a hand summary of the laws and key principles: Ten laws: 1. Reduce: The simplest way to achieve simplicity is through thoughtful reduction. 2. Organize: Organization makes a system of many appear fewer. 3. Time: Savings in time feel like simplicity. 4. Learn: Knowledge makes everything simpler. 5. Differences: Simplicity and complexity need each other. 6. Context: What lies in the periphery of sim This short (100 page) book gives 10 laws and 3 key properties for designing simple systems. Maeda provides a hand summary of the laws and key principles: Ten laws: 1. Reduce: The simplest way to achieve simplicity is through thoughtful reduction. 2. Organize: Organization makes a system of many appear fewer. 3. Time: Savings in time feel like simplicity. 4. Learn: Knowledge makes everything simpler. 5. Differences: Simplicity and complexity need each other. 6. Context: What lies in the periphery of simplicity is definitely not peripheral. 7. Emotion: More emotions are better than less. 8. Trust: In simplicity we trust. 9. Failure: Some things can never be made simple. 10. The One: Simplicity is about subtracting the obvious, and adding the meaningful. Three key principles: 1. Away: More appears like less simply by moving it far, far away. 2. Open: Openness simplifies complexity. 3. Power: Use less, gain more. I fail to see the difference between the laws and principles (maybe Maeda just didn't want 13 laws ;), but other than that, these feel like a good set of principles to keep in mind when designing. They capture many common design dilemmas. For example, systems are often designed for expert and novice users. The "Learn" principle can be used to frame this dilemma. A novice user has no knowledge about your system; an expert user has that knowledge. The system should provide necessary knowledge to the user while not getting in the way of the expert. By reducing the knowledge needed (law 1), possibly by relying on knowledge the user already has (law 4) this dual nature may be achievable. There may still be problems because some complexity is inherent in trying to cater to two user groups (law 9). The Laws of Simplicity rings true. It is consistent with what I have read of Don Norman's work and with a good deal of what I remember from Jef Raskin's book The Humane Interface. It is also consistent with what I learned in HCI and my own experience. One nitpick: the book tried to hard to push the associated website. Once at the end would have been enough. I can forgive it that quirk since it was, in general quite spiffy (and shiny, literally; the cover had pretty shiny bits).

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    well, i was hoping for much more philosophy. turned out to be mostly about product design. also, the register was often annoyingly sort of oprahish. explaining to the reader why certain objects make them feel certain emotions, with the implication that if you follow these instructions and buy objects satisfying the following guidelines, you'll soon be feeling better emotions. that said, i actually really liked most of the 10 laws, and just wish that in the exposition he'd had more examples about b well, i was hoping for much more philosophy. turned out to be mostly about product design. also, the register was often annoyingly sort of oprahish. explaining to the reader why certain objects make them feel certain emotions, with the implication that if you follow these instructions and buy objects satisfying the following guidelines, you'll soon be feeling better emotions. that said, i actually really liked most of the 10 laws, and just wish that in the exposition he'd had more examples about buddhist monks and education, and less about ipods and google. also, i liked that he consciously applied his laws to his own efforts, limiting the book to 100 pages, etc. i'll always give you a star for taking things to the next meta-level.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brynn

    "Simplicity is about the unexpected pleasure derived from what is likely to be insignificant and would otherwise go unnoticed." (2) "The Pareto Principle is useful as a rule of thumb: assume that in any given bin of data, generally 80% can be managed at lower priority and 20% requires the highest level. Everything is important, but knowing where to start is the critical first step." (14) "The best designers in the world all squint when they look at something. They squint to see the forest from the "Simplicity is about the unexpected pleasure derived from what is likely to be insignificant and would otherwise go unnoticed." (2) "The Pareto Principle is useful as a rule of thumb: assume that in any given bin of data, generally 80% can be managed at lower priority and 20% requires the highest level. Everything is important, but knowing where to start is the critical first step." (14) "The best designers in the world all squint when they look at something. They squint to see the forest from the trees- to find the right balance. Squint at the world. You will see more, by seeing less." (21) "At the end of the day, there is an end of the day. Thus choosing when to care less versus when to care more lies at the heart of living an efficient but fulfilling daily life." (26) "Knowledge is comfort, and comfort lies at the heart of simplicity." (29) "Design starts by leveraging the human instinct to relate, followed by translating the relationship into a tangible object or service, and then ideally adding a little surprise at the end to make your audience's efforts worthwhile." (39) "The opportunity lost by increasing the amount of blank space is gained back with enhanced attention on what remains. More white space means that less information is presented. In turn, proportionately more attention shall be paid to that which is made less available. When there is less, we appreciate everything much more." (56) "The best art makes your head spin with questions. Perhaps this is the fundamental distinction between pure art and pure design. While great art makes you wonder, great design makes things clear." (70) "Marc poignantly surmised that memories are all that matter in the end." (100)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ettore Pasquini

    If this book was supposed to make me a better designer, it failed. It's a collection of thoughts on design taken from a more abstract/holistic point of view. This wouldn't be a bad idea in itself, if only these reflections were a little more insightful. For some (most?) of them I failed to read between the lines. Example: What good is to explain how the TAB key works and how powerful it is in organizing data? Or forcing gratuitious acronyms upon your readers and pretending they'd remember them? If this book was supposed to make me a better designer, it failed. It's a collection of thoughts on design taken from a more abstract/holistic point of view. This wouldn't be a bad idea in itself, if only these reflections were a little more insightful. For some (most?) of them I failed to read between the lines. Example: What good is to explain how the TAB key works and how powerful it is in organizing data? Or forcing gratuitious acronyms upon your readers and pretending they'd remember them? Speaking about acronyms: what do they have to do with design anyway? The author discovers new ones in every page, and it gets annoying quickly. However, I liked the idea of "laws," or abstract guiding principles. I think it would have been better to be more schematic and simply discuss examples of each one. When Iwata does so he's pretty good, for example explaining the iPod UI evolution across the years. What's wrong with keeping it... simple and just do that?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rafael Bandeira

    Good study on what simplicity, both real and perceived, are made of, and what to focus on to achieve it. For product design or business management, or even daily life, good concepts are present in the book to help simplify or better understand the complexity around these. The book is written in a personal and casual tone, sometimes even funny, that transmits a lot about the author, John Maeda, and gives an enjoyable feeling to follow through, as sounds a lot like a conversation. The small size al Good study on what simplicity, both real and perceived, are made of, and what to focus on to achieve it. For product design or business management, or even daily life, good concepts are present in the book to help simplify or better understand the complexity around these. The book is written in a personal and casual tone, sometimes even funny, that transmits a lot about the author, John Maeda, and gives an enjoyable feeling to follow through, as sounds a lot like a conversation. The small size also helps a lot. There are somewhat confuse parts, when you don't really know whether they fit on understanding complexity or striving for simplicity. Although a light and easy reading, a good deal of attention is required. I read it in Portuguese, so maybe the translation didn't help much. Looking forward to re-read in English. A great book, highly recommended!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mat Ranson

    I like Maeda, I have one of his old design books. This one started off well enough but quite soon I began to feel it wasn't really aimed at me. Maeda has a great capacity for summarising and shrinking information into simple, digestible phrases, but I couldn't help thinking with The Laws Of Simplicity he was shaping aesthetics and technology into metaphors aimed at middle managers looking for the latest self-help book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

    The book starts off on a strong note with the first law of simplicity: thoughtful reduction. Reduction is achieved through the principles of shrinking, hiding and embodying. Technologies have been simplified through technological progress, which has allowed small objects to have the same technological capability as larger ones. The size of an object leads to surprise and awe and can be more forgiving than a larger one. An object can also be simplified by hiding features and leaving only the esse The book starts off on a strong note with the first law of simplicity: thoughtful reduction. Reduction is achieved through the principles of shrinking, hiding and embodying. Technologies have been simplified through technological progress, which has allowed small objects to have the same technological capability as larger ones. The size of an object leads to surprise and awe and can be more forgiving than a larger one. An object can also be simplified by hiding features and leaving only the essential ones. When an object is small and features are hidden, it may be more difficult for someone to believe it is better. Therefore the last principle is to embed the object with value. This can be through actual materials which are superior, or through marketing tactics. Maeda's next 9 laws lose the design focus of the first chapter and the examples he uses are not useful. For instance, Maeda's solution to organization (the second law) is to group tasks using sticky notes or creating a mind map. This isn't providing much of a solution to organization. Maeda draws heavily on Apple, which is probably a good example since everyone is familiar with the company's products. While his laws, like saving time (Law 3) make sense, his examples do not. Is Apple's shuffle only iPod really saving much time rather than fumbling around selecting a song? Maybe Maeda's book is too generic; rather than trying to address design, technology, business and life, he should try to simplify by eliminating so many topics he is trying to cover. And, according to Law 4, "Learn", he should repeat often the main message of these at the end of each chapter as they are not so clear from the text.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    This is really a list of 10 or 13 laws/principles of simple design, with a little discussion and a few examples under each. The laws seemed pretty simple, so simple they seemed either self evident or not a large leap to extrapolate from experiences. I didn't find anything groundbreaking, but it is good to have a list like this to think about when you hit a design issue. I listened on audio, and this had the issues of most books focusing on lists - it gives the listener too much to remember. I'd This is really a list of 10 or 13 laws/principles of simple design, with a little discussion and a few examples under each. The laws seemed pretty simple, so simple they seemed either self evident or not a large leap to extrapolate from experiences. I didn't find anything groundbreaking, but it is good to have a list like this to think about when you hit a design issue. I listened on audio, and this had the issues of most books focusing on lists - it gives the listener too much to remember. I'd say the paper book would be better, but this is short, and you can find the list of laws on the internet, including in a top review on Goodreads.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dave Sanders

    This is a sort of "Zen and the art of Being Simple." It's not full of practical advice, but more of a thought-process and style that you should apply to everything to make it simple. Some good underlying principles for those who are designers or who need to communicate ideas, but quite lacking in practical application. Amusing book for a limited audience I think.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Simon Bostock

    This is a kind of 'barely book' - it's slight, in every sense of the word, and I can barely recall any of it. But I wrote oodles in the margins. And I've thought 'through' the book many times. Go figure.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ra La

    I was never able to move past that the author could not comprehend of people different from him. For people that need more than play and fast-forward for your media devices, you are not a part of his target audience.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Skyler

    For a book that came out when Amazon only sold books and Friendster was the leading example of a social network, this book is pretty relevant. A good set of design principles that I found could be applied to my work. It delved into spiritual wishy-washy self-help to a degree, but I can see myself returning to this book for inspo.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mabel

    I really liked this book and its wry sense of humor. The ideas are well...simple but complex. It’s interesting and full and makes me hmmmm about his ideas and the kinds of ways that they reflect and challenge how I think. I enjoyed this immensely and I think it’s a worthwhile quick read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Enrique

    This is worth a read for designers and technologists. I added an extra star because I read it cover to cover in about 1.5 hours and—as a slow reader—that felt great.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Leticia Supple

    John Maeda, fascinated by simplicity, has distilled the art of simplicity down to 10 Laws. This text walks you through them, and it is not exactly a simple work. I say that it is not simple because, while it is a short read it is a lot of information to process. In the beginning, the author states that you could read this in a lunchtime. Well, not unless your lunchtime is at least three hours' long: That's actually how long it took me to read it, over two days. Maybe this days more about the type John Maeda, fascinated by simplicity, has distilled the art of simplicity down to 10 Laws. This text walks you through them, and it is not exactly a simple work. I say that it is not simple because, while it is a short read it is a lot of information to process. In the beginning, the author states that you could read this in a lunchtime. Well, not unless your lunchtime is at least three hours' long: That's actually how long it took me to read it, over two days. Maybe this days more about the type of employment the author has (he lectures at MIT) than anything else. But the work is also quite academic. It follows typical academic paper structure. And the author has created a whole lot of acronyms to help the laws carry. After reading this, I remember two of them (she, slip), but I can't for the life of me tell you what they stand for. It's an interesting proposition, to discover the laws of simplicity. If you're working in product design then you will want to get your hands on this book and give it a good going over. But it's not exactly applicable to everything else. Some of it I found quite valuable (especially the notions of comfort and simplicity, and of freedom and comfort, where empowering people through knowledge is a core element), but most of it was curio value only. The One law, Law 10, states that simplicity is about subtracting the obvious and adding meaningful value. But to get here, you have to wade some seriously dense material. At times I actually couldn't follow the flow of the book; ideas seemed disconnected and disjointed, the narrative was all over the place, and the examples actually didn't highlight anything in particular. Except for the fact that the author is an Apple fan boy. Many of the examples could have been removed or (better! Changed!) and improved the reading experience. It's a huge gripe I have with this book, actually. And perhaps it's because the work has come out such an academic perspective - but many of the examples have really low value over all. If they had been any good, I would have expected to remember more than one of the ten laws. In any case, it's a reasonable read if you're interested in the art of simplicity. Just don't expect it to be amazing, or even, dare I say, accessible.

  16. 4 out of 5

    T Cho

    John Maeda's The Laws of Simplicity is a delightful, tasteful read. It is a book about design, technology, art, feelings, philosophy, humans, nature, human nature, and everything in between. First of all, when I saw the book nobly sitting on the shelf in the Museum of Art and Design in NY, I found myself immediately gravitating towards it. I was enticed by its slim size and sleek, fashionable cover. I can assure you that the book's impressive looks are matched by the impressive content and insig John Maeda's The Laws of Simplicity is a delightful, tasteful read. It is a book about design, technology, art, feelings, philosophy, humans, nature, human nature, and everything in between. First of all, when I saw the book nobly sitting on the shelf in the Museum of Art and Design in NY, I found myself immediately gravitating towards it. I was enticed by its slim size and sleek, fashionable cover. I can assure you that the book's impressive looks are matched by the impressive content and insights that reside within its pages. Maeda's personal insights are the heart of the book. He has mastered the art of story-telling, in which a "moral of the story" is included. The book is rather humbly written, not the least bit intimidating, and highly relatable. The book has no shortage of humor and wordplay. And can I just add that the visuals were great :-) Maeda is the master of clarity and organization in writing. Don't be fooled by the book's succinctness. There's truly deep stuff in there. What I like is that you don't have to dig too deep to find the treasures in the writing. Maeda's has got them all laid out for you, in beautifully organized chapters and subheadings. The only thing I would say is that the acronyms, which, according to Maeda, are implemented to help readers better understand his concepts, were a bit petty and unnecessary (for my taste), but nonetheless did not completely reverse my admiration for the book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mahrous

    With fast progress in technology, I think we shouldn't read self-help books about technology that was written more than 2 years ago from the reading time. The Ten laws: 1. Reduce: The simplest way to achieve simplicity is through thoughtful reduction. 2. Organize: Organization makes a system of many appear fewer. 3. Time: Savings in time feel like simplicity. 4. Learn: Knowledge makes everything simpler. 5. Differences: Simplicity and complexity need each other. 6. Context: What lies in the periphery o With fast progress in technology, I think we shouldn't read self-help books about technology that was written more than 2 years ago from the reading time. The Ten laws: 1. Reduce: The simplest way to achieve simplicity is through thoughtful reduction. 2. Organize: Organization makes a system of many appear fewer. 3. Time: Savings in time feel like simplicity. 4. Learn: Knowledge makes everything simpler. 5. Differences: Simplicity and complexity need each other. 6. Context: What lies in the periphery of simplicity is definitely not peripheral. 7. Emotion: More emotions are better than less. 8. Trust: In simplicity we trust. 9. Failure: Some things can never be made simple. 10. The One: Simplicity is about subtracting the obvious, and adding the meaningful. Neither all the laws were well-explained nor the examples were related and interesting. The writer promised What He Couldn't Deliver.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Glenda

    John Maeda's short, direct essays on the "laws of simplicity" as he defines them, are from a technical viewpoint (both design and technology), but accessible, fresh, and thoughtful. The most engaging ideas for me, as a writer, concerned the role of design in discerning "clarity" (of thought, product, purpose) and that essence within art (what is moving, unexpected, transcendent, beautiful perhaps) that is fundamental to the human spirit, a luminous "reason" for living. This is a likable book tha John Maeda's short, direct essays on the "laws of simplicity" as he defines them, are from a technical viewpoint (both design and technology), but accessible, fresh, and thoughtful. The most engaging ideas for me, as a writer, concerned the role of design in discerning "clarity" (of thought, product, purpose) and that essence within art (what is moving, unexpected, transcendent, beautiful perhaps) that is fundamental to the human spirit, a luminous "reason" for living. This is a likable book that tends to the ruminative. Maeda's ideas on the meaningful qualities of simplicity philosophically bridge both technical and life questions in design and purpose.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Vishal Solanki

    Great book for those who want to think about their Innovative approaches! Each title of the Chapter gives us a view what it is gonna deal with which helps us reduce the simplest way to achieve simplicity that could be through thoughtful reduction.organisation makes thing look more organised and easier to solve and fewer, which in turn helps in saving time.Learning helps us gain knowledge and help us complete our task in much easier way..Trust in yourself to achieve big.Failure makes us weak but Great book for those who want to think about their Innovative approaches! Each title of the Chapter gives us a view what it is gonna deal with which helps us reduce the simplest way to achieve simplicity that could be through thoughtful reduction.organisation makes thing look more organised and easier to solve and fewer, which in turn helps in saving time.Learning helps us gain knowledge and help us complete our task in much easier way..Trust in yourself to achieve big.Failure makes us weak but also increases our hunger to achieve success!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    I thought it was ok...probably a book I will reach for in my design work, but overall I thought it was a little too "cutesy" and quaint. I think the underlying themes are timeless, but it felt like some of the methods they were presented would seem dated in a very short time. I think I get more insight/value from Mr. Maeda's blog. Without giving anything away, I think the best (most important?) nugget of wisdom comes on the very last page of book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Earl Gray

    My review of this remarkable, spare, and beautiful book is this quote from the author: "Simplicity is about subtracting the obvious, and adding the meaningful." - John Maeda This is one I will reread often. I hope you do, too.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Allen

    This is surprisingly subpar material from someone I greatly admire. The book lacks historical context and the examples used are quite ho-hum.

  23. 4 out of 5

    krad

    Turned out surprisingly well, given my contempt and impatience for most design fluff-pieces. A little like the Art of War for modern design. Would rec if you're in the business.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carlos Silva

    The Laws of Simplicity is one of a series of books I've recently taken to read on technology, design, usability, and computer science (a pretty narrow area of expertise as the use of four terms, themselves quite narrow and easy to define, can demonstrate). Other examples of this small bookshelf coincidentally - or perhaps not - included other MIT professors or published authors such as Nick Montfort and Paul Ceruzzi. Nevertheless, the work of Maeda appears to distinguish itself from other books The Laws of Simplicity is one of a series of books I've recently taken to read on technology, design, usability, and computer science (a pretty narrow area of expertise as the use of four terms, themselves quite narrow and easy to define, can demonstrate). Other examples of this small bookshelf coincidentally - or perhaps not - included other MIT professors or published authors such as Nick Montfort and Paul Ceruzzi. Nevertheless, the work of Maeda appears to distinguish itself from other books on the topic, on its ability to quickly transcend the boundaries of academia and technology development. The rules for simplicity defined on its pages apply not just to the development of easier to use and more enjoyable objects, but also to the continuous search for a more productive, healthier role to play as a actor in your academic, business, and family spheres. As a suggestion of Maeda, the 9 rules outlined in the book can be summed up in the this simple general principle: "Simplicity is about substracting the obvious, and adding the meaninfull" (p. 89).

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rohit Patel

    Three Line Summary: Often the concept of simplicity is talked about in a particular context, be it design, business or human thoughts... but this book encompass it all. True to it's nature, the book is quite compact and the fact that the author was able to fit such a broad subject in 100 page itself reflects on his mastery on the topic. The book starts of with the more direct approach to simplicity talking about, reducing, organizing etc and then takes a more deeper and philosophical view of sim Three Line Summary: Often the concept of simplicity is talked about in a particular context, be it design, business or human thoughts... but this book encompass it all. True to it's nature, the book is quite compact and the fact that the author was able to fit such a broad subject in 100 page itself reflects on his mastery on the topic. The book starts of with the more direct approach to simplicity talking about, reducing, organizing etc and then takes a more deeper and philosophical view of simplicity. . Some good ideas: . "Simplicity is about subtracting the obvious and adding the meaningful." . "Technology and life only becomes complex if you let it be so." . "Technology has made out lives more full, yet at the same time we've become uncomfortably "full". . "Memories are all that matter in the end"

  26. 5 out of 5

    André Santos

    The Laws of Simplicity enumerates 10 laws and 3 keys that define the road to identifying and/or achieving simplicity, applied to any field of life. Overall, the book is short and an easy read for anyone interested in an overview on the topic, as the author turns simplicity explicit through specific characteristics (e.g., reducing, organizing, learning, failing) and personal examples. Interesting insights are also scattered throughout the book, which retain the attention of the reader after putti The Laws of Simplicity enumerates 10 laws and 3 keys that define the road to identifying and/or achieving simplicity, applied to any field of life. Overall, the book is short and an easy read for anyone interested in an overview on the topic, as the author turns simplicity explicit through specific characteristics (e.g., reducing, organizing, learning, failing) and personal examples. Interesting insights are also scattered throughout the book, which retain the attention of the reader after putting the book down, such as, "organization makes a system of many appear fewer", "without the counterpoint of complexity, we could not recognize simplicity when we see it", "some things can never be made simple", "simplicity if about subtracting the obvious and adding the meaningful".

  27. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    The laws in this book are very abstract, making it difficult for some to understand how to apply it in their work. However, this is probably the 4th time I've read this book because I continually uncover how new concepts I learn (especially design related ones) are tied to these laws. For example, the simple law that organizing information reduces complexity is obvious. However, when reading books on System 1 (heuristic based) vs. System 2 (critical based) thinking you realize that when informati The laws in this book are very abstract, making it difficult for some to understand how to apply it in their work. However, this is probably the 4th time I've read this book because I continually uncover how new concepts I learn (especially design related ones) are tied to these laws. For example, the simple law that organizing information reduces complexity is obvious. However, when reading books on System 1 (heuristic based) vs. System 2 (critical based) thinking you realize that when information is organized times we short circuit to System 1 thinking thus providing the impression of simplicity. Overall would recommend for people who like to tie abstract ideas across design, psychology and everyday phenomenon.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Carl Rannaberg

    Decent little book about ten fundamental laws of simplicity: 1. Reduce. The simplest way to achieve simplicity is through thoughtful reduction. 2. Organize. Organization makes a system of many appear fewer. 3. Time. Savings in time feel like simplicity. 4. Learn. Knowledge makes everything simpler. 5. Differences. Simplicity and complexity need each other. 6. Context. What lies in the periphery of simplicity is definitely not peripheral. 7. Emotion. More emotions are better than less. 8. Trust. In simpl Decent little book about ten fundamental laws of simplicity: 1. Reduce. The simplest way to achieve simplicity is through thoughtful reduction. 2. Organize. Organization makes a system of many appear fewer. 3. Time. Savings in time feel like simplicity. 4. Learn. Knowledge makes everything simpler. 5. Differences. Simplicity and complexity need each other. 6. Context. What lies in the periphery of simplicity is definitely not peripheral. 7. Emotion. More emotions are better than less. 8. Trust. In simplicity we trust. 9. Failure. Some things can never be made simple. 10. The One. Simplicity is about subtracting the obvious, and adding the meaningful. Examples in this book are mostly about design but also go into the everyday life.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Mills

    Although some product-related anecdotes are dated (the book was written in 2006), the underlying principles are still valid and worthwhile. The acronym mnemonics (e.g SHE, BRAIN, etc.) became slightly grating after a while, but they serve a useful purpose. The Learn, Trust and Failure section "spoke loudest" to me personally. I wonder if these principles could be applied to less concrete things, such as a workflow process, or creating story narratives? There's also reference to a successor book b Although some product-related anecdotes are dated (the book was written in 2006), the underlying principles are still valid and worthwhile. The acronym mnemonics (e.g SHE, BRAIN, etc.) became slightly grating after a while, but they serve a useful purpose. The Learn, Trust and Failure section "spoke loudest" to me personally. I wonder if these principles could be applied to less concrete things, such as a workflow process, or creating story narratives? There's also reference to a successor book by Jessie Scanlon, called "The Value of Simplicity", but I have not been able to locate that book so far.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jay DiNitto

    This is an odd, non-technical UX design book. It reads more like a personal philosophical treatise than, say, an explanation of the modern design process. But that fact shouldn't deter you. Maeda offers 10 short, understandable rules for design simplicity, and the book is short enough that you risk very little time commitment in diving in if you're not sure. There are times when Maeda's prose is noticeably ESL (though I don't know if English actually is his second language), but the angular phra This is an odd, non-technical UX design book. It reads more like a personal philosophical treatise than, say, an explanation of the modern design process. But that fact shouldn't deter you. Maeda offers 10 short, understandable rules for design simplicity, and the book is short enough that you risk very little time commitment in diving in if you're not sure. There are times when Maeda's prose is noticeably ESL (though I don't know if English actually is his second language), but the angular phrasing is more endearing than confusing. Filled with personal anecdotes and good bit of user-centric psychology, The Laws of Simplicity is an effective curveball in your design reading arsenal.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.